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students, video observations

Teacher Video Observations for a Changing World

The most transformative device of the 21st century, and arguably in all of human history, was created in 2007.  The first generation iPhone introduced us to a new wave of technology called smartphones.  It’s slogan was, “This is only the beginning…”.  How right were they?!  It’s 11 years later, and smartphones are part of our everyday lives just like getting dressed or going to work. As such, it’s no surprise that these devices will play an important role in how schools prepare, educate, and cultivate the next generation; particularly as it pertains to using video observations to improve instructional practices.

What does the future job industry look like?

According to the Institute For the Future, IFTF, 85% of the jobs people will have in 2030 haven’t even been invented yet (future jobs). This means that teachers today are preparing students for jobs that don’t even exist yet. Let that sink in for a minute!  It’s critical that we help teachers and students prepare for this approaching reality.

What are the skills that will be needed?

Although we may not know what these jobs will be, we do know that students will need skills like critical thinking, problem solving, and collaboration as well as the ability to adjust quickly in a rapidly-changing technological world. But, if teachers are to better prepare students for this, teachers should be innovators, too (innovative teachers).

What are the goals in order to get there?

Billionaire venture capitalist John Doerr, an early backer of Google and Amazon, understands innovation. His success, he says, comes from setting transparent goals he calls OKRs (objectives and key results) and evaluating them. More importantly, however, is that Doerr also gives permission to fail, because he says it is better to aim high and meet 70% of your goals than aim low and meet 100% of them.  Perhaps this same idea should be applied to education to encourage teacher innovators as they create professional growth goals?  After all, a goal without a plan is just a wish.

What will determine success?

Teachers, too, need permission to fail. They need to be able to try new things without fear. This will open the door to innovative ideas that encourage student engagement focused on creative thinking, problem solving, and collaboration. Teachers and evaluators can use video observations, like iAspire Reflect, to discuss ideas that worked and change the ones that didn’t. In this way, teachers can equip students with the skills they need to navigate this brave new world.

Video observations are the future of teacher evaluations because they support self-reflection, allow for more frequent coaching cycles, and can be self-driven.  This allows teachers to adapt and grow so they can prepare students for those jobs that haven’t even been invented yet!

Teacher Evaluation

Using Videos During Teacher Observations Part 3 – Helping You Get Started

The reflection that I did myself, when I videoed, offered me more opportunity for growth than anything an outsider could do for me. Watching my kids, what went on in my room, how I handled it, and things I said—that was more important than any sit-down that I could have with anybody [else]. ” Best Foot Forward teacher, North Carolina (2013)1

In this third installment of our Using Videos During Teacher Observations series, we will dive right in to what the research says with regard to using videos to support teacher observations.  Our previous two posts can be found here: My Own Struggles and Creating an environment where teachers self reflect.

I’m guessing most of you don’t formally use videos during your teacher observations.  Coaching?  Maybe.  The observer sitting down, watching the lesson on video, and providing feedback specific based on what was seen on film?  Probably not.  There are a lot of reasons why schools are hesitant to use videos.  According to Harvard University’s Center for Education Policy Research and their Best Foot Forward Project, these reasons may include but are not limited to:

  • Compliance Culture
  • Rudimentary Reflection
  • Inflexible Time
  • Inadequate content area feedback

I’ve personally had conversations with several administrators who had various other reasons why they aren’t using videos for teacher observations.  These reasons include their Union won’t allow it, they don’t have the appropriate technology, there is not a simple way to do it, and they are afraid of teachers putting on the proverbial “dog and pony show”.  Others had concerns about students being recorded and what would be required from a policy perspective to allow for recording in the classroom.  However 95% of these administrators rated the potential of video reflections/observations as having a major impact in their school.  In other words, most (95%) think using videos during observations would make a positive difference for them and their teachers.  They just aren’t doing it.

The aforementioned Best Foot Forward Project from Harvard University does a fantastic job providing specific suggestions to break through these barriers.  Their toolkit is simply amazing.  If you haven’t reviewed their toolkit, you should download it now.  The Toolkit provides support in the following areas:

  • Leveraging Video for Learning
    • Video for self-reflection, peer collaboration, virtual coaching, evaluation, and building a video library
  • Cultivating Trust in Video Observations
    • Create a safe environment for teachers and communicate with parents and manage student privacy concerns
  • Turnkey Technology: Setting up Schools for Effective Implementation
    • Choose the right technology, set up your infrastructure, train teachers and observers
  • Measuring Readiness and Assessing Success
    • Ensure readiness, Assess Success
  • Appendix
  • References

Speaking of the dog and pony show, The Best Foot Forward project addressed that directly in its Leveraging Video for Learning section: “If teachers control the camera, they are able to choose a videotaped lesson that they believe represents a comprehensive view of their best work.  Not only does this process increase teacher agency in evaluation, but it also encourages teachers to rewatch several lessons and contemplate what constitutes effective, evaluation-worthy instruction before choosing what will be submitted to the administrator.”  Later it reads “…teachers put their ‘best foot forward’, but this did not fundamentally change the distribution of observation scores between teachers.”2  For a more detailed quantitative review, please see the Best Foot Forward research brief.

The Best Foot Forward Project also includes a self-guided module for analyzing videos of your own instruction, a self-analysis noticing rubric, coaching conversation scripts, and many other worthwhile resources.

If you are considering using videos to support teacher reflection, coaching, and/or evaluation, the guidance from the Best Foot Forward project may help you map an implementation schedule and feel comfortable doing so.  There are definitely logistics to consider, timing issues, collective bargaining disagreements, and other barriers you will face, but best practice suggests using video can have a positive impact on your entire observation process.

Next week we will take a look at how a professional athlete uses video to improve his game, and you may even learn a little bit about Simon Sinek’s Golden Circle.

 

Have you used videos during any of your observations, coaching cycles, or evaluations?  If so, how did it go?

 

1Fullerton, J., Greenberg, M., Kane, T., Le, L., Quinn, D., Thal, D., & Zelaya, S. (2015). Leveraging Video for Learning: Strategies for Using Video Observations for Professional Growth [PDF]. Center for Education Policy Research. p. 2

2Fullerton, J., Greenberg, M., Kane, T., Le, L., Quinn, D., Thal, D., & Zelaya, S. (2015). Leveraging Video for Learning: Strategies for Using Video Observations for Professional Growth [PDF]. Center for Education Policy Research. p. 11-12

SMART Goal Setting Teacher Education

6 Best Practices for Professional Growth Goals

“A goal properly set is halfway reached.” – Zig Ziglar

For many of you, another school year has come and gone.  Have you reflected on what professional or organizational goals you and your staff accomplished?  If you haven’t, you’re not alone.  A study in 2016 found that only 8% of people set and achieve their goals.  Yes, you read that correctly! 92% of us don’t set and achieve goals.  We want to help this number grow, starting with you!

The truth is, setting and reviewing professional growth goals is a rewarding process and is necessary to achieve professional growth.  Fortunately for you, we’ve condensed this process into 6 best practices for professional growth goals as outlined below.

  •  Professional Growth Goals should be collaborative, but teacher-driven.

In their 2010 book, Advancing the Three-Minute Walkthrough: Mastering Reflective Practice, Carolyn Downey and colleagues emphasize the importance of professional growth goals grounded not only in self-reflection, but also in reflective dialogue with administrators, coaches, and/or fellow teachers.  

  • Professional Growth Goals should be individualized.

This is pretty straight-forward. No two teachers should have the same professional learning goal. Boston Public Schools has some good examples and templates for professional growth goals and professional learning plans.

  • Professional Growth Goals should be based on information from various tools/processes.

When most people make big decisions, they seek information from a variety of sources and a variety of trusted people.  Professional growth is no different.  Professional growth goals should be derived from  a combination of self-assessment, walkthroughs, observations, student data, and reflective dialogue to name a few.

  • Professional Growth Goals should be written as a SMART goal.

In case you’ve never heard of a SMART goal, here is a general article about SMART goals and how to use them.

Check out this specific example of a SMART Professional Growth Goal.

Professional Growth Goals

  • Professional Growth Goal progress should be reviewed mid-year.

This moves the process from primarily summative to more formative. Nobody makes goal adjustments on information they don’t have! The review should be face-to-face, productive, and focused. Specific recommendations should come out of the meeting to help achieve the professional growth goal by the end of the school year.

  • Professional Learning Goals should be tethered to an individualized professional learning plan.

The professional learning plan should outline intentional activities designed to support learning of the educator in accordance with their individualized professional growth goal.  Think of it this way: The professional growth goal is the destination, and the professional learning plan is the roadmap to get there!

 

If you use these 6 best practices to guide professional growth goals, you’ll join the 8% of people who set and achieve their goals!

 

“If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else.” – Yogi Berra

 

Teacher Observations

Infographic – 5 Best Practices for Teacher Observations

Just two weeks ago, we published a blog post highlighting 5 best practices for teacher observations.

It was so popular, we decided to turn it into a simple infographic to share with others!

Best Practices for Teacher Observations

Sources:

https://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/implementation-support-unit/tech-assist/usingobservationstoImproveteacherpractice.pdf

http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/HE/TeachrAssmntWhtPaperTransform10_2.pdf

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2016/04/20/charlotte-danielson-on-rethinking-teacher-evaluation.html

https://networkforpubliceducation.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/NPETeacherEvalReport.pdf

teacher coaching

To Differentiate Professional Development? Or Not?

We expect our teachers to personalize the learning in their classrooms, to differentiate to meet the needs and learning styles of all students.  This is considered best practice.  After all, each student comes to us from a unique background, has different experiences, and learns in a certain way.  For example, student A comes from poverty, has limited experience in literacy, and helps to take care of his younger brother each night while his single parent works two jobs to keep the family afloat.  Student B has a different story: she has two parents at home who work during the day, has soccer practice three days per week, is read to each night, and travels with her family each summer on vacation.  Most teachers wouldn’t dream of treating these two students identically.  So they don’t.

Administrators are in a similar situation.  Instead of students, they have teachers to consider.  Each teacher comes to us from a variety of backgrounds, has different experiences, and learns in a certain way.  Sounds familiar?  It’s just like the students in the teacher’s class.

In a classroom, oftentimes the teacher’s intention is for students to transfer their learning.  The teacher has a vision of a specific outcome, performance assessment, problem the students must solve, project to complete, etc.  Throughout the learning, the teacher reinforces what each student is doing well and scaffolds when needed.  It is only through this backwards planning, starting with the end in mind, can the teacher personalize the learning for each student.

Shouldn’t administrators adopt this same mentality when it comes to professional development for our teachers?  Isn’t what is best practice for our students also going to be best practice for our teachers?  Not so fast.

Administrators need to consider the idea of fragmentation.  Fragmentation occurs when there is little direction and focus for where the staff is going.  Professional development can become fragmented if there is no clear target, goal, or direction.  Simply differentiating professional develop for the sake of calling it differentiated will lead to confusion, lack of clarity, and few meaningful outcomes.  Teachers will become upset and wait for this learning to pass.  Without a clear direction or end goal, the learning will not stick.

However, if the administrator has a clear vision of the end, much like the teacher has a clear and authentic assessment, differentiated professional development can, and most likely will, align everyone’s efforts.  The key is the administrator having a clear direction and defined outcomes.  The administrator then provides scaffolding and reinforcement specific to each teacher throughout the learning.  The goal is for the administrator to know where the teachers are going and guide them to their destination.

What are your experiences with differentiating professional Development?  Have you run into fragmentation?

Eric Bransteter